Nina Hyde Center for Breast Cancer Research

 

The Nina Hyde Center for Breast Cancer Research promotes advanced breast cancer research at the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. The research done at the Nina Hyde Center makes Georgetown one of the leading institutions for breast cancer research. According to ESI Thompson Scientific, Georgetown University is ranked 8th in the world for the number of scientific papers on breast cancer.

Georgetown University is ranked 8th in the world for scientific publications in the field of breast cancer

The Nina Hyde Center for Breast Cancer Research was established in 1989 as a tribute to Nina Hyde, former fashion editor of The Washington Post. Fashion designer Ralph Lauren and the late Washington Post Company president Katharine Graham, were the founders of the center.

The Nina Hyde Center represents a long-standing, concerted, multidisciplinary strategy, between Lombardi's basic scientists, population researchers, and clinicians. More than 50 Lombardi scientists and physicians study breast cancer, striving to uncover the biological basis of the many faces of breast cancer, and to work towards its prevention and cure, particularly in the Washington, DC-Baltimore, MD area.

Breast cancer is one of the top two causes of cancer mortality in women, and the Washington, DC area suffers the highest incidence of breast cancer, nationwide. The Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center works to address these problems nationally and locally through its Nina Hyde Breast Cancer Center. Lombardi is the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer center in the Washington DC-metro area.

Philanthropic donations to the Nina Hyde Center support one of the world's largest and most respected breast cancer research programs. Funds donated to the Nina Hyde Center empower Lombardi scientists to pursue promising ideas still in their infancy. These gifts support the work that is most speculative and most likely to find a cure. Funds donated to the Nina Hyde Center also enable Lombardi's administration to encourage and retain the most gifted young researchers.